Posts Tagged meaning

What’s in a word (or several)?

I would like to thank Lorna Dargan from Newcastle University for contributing this guest posting. — David.
Words as skin

You are constructed of words

I was thinking recently about how my clients conceptualise their careers, and it reminded me of some work I did in my last job as an urban policy researcher (bear with me, there is a link in there somewhere). In my research I used a theoretical approach called ‘discourse analysis’. It occurred to me that I’ve been tentatively using it in guidance sessions, and I was wondering whether I could take it further.

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In the right zone

Zones of impact

What zone are you in?

A model that I use quite frequently in one-to-one guidance and group sessions is one that I cobbled together myself. I call it the Zones model (or Zones of Impact model).

The original spark for the idea came from the Cognitive Information Processing model. I was scared off by words such as ‘metacognitions’, but the idea of different domains of thinking appealed to me, as did the notion of using these domains to identify the type of help that would be most appropriate for particular clients. Further inspiration came from the knowing-why, knowing-how and knowing-whom of the Intelligent Career model and Blooms Taxonomy of Learning. I later came across the Transformational Learning model (sometimes called triple loop learning) which again looks at different levels of change that might take place with a client.

Out of these various sources of inspiration, I wanted to make a model that I would find easy to remember which would help me to locate and assess the type of help I was giving to clients. Thus was born the Zones of Impact model. The model attempts to classify different areas of client needs in four primary zones.

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